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A man relaxes on a barge as it travels up the Chao Phraya river north of Bangkok, Thailand.

A man relaxes on a barge as it travels up the Chao Phraya river north of Bangkok, Thailand.

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Looking down the Firth of Clyde.
The chimney of Inverkip Power Station has dominated this view since the 1970s but on 28th July it’s being demolished by explosives. At 236m (778ft) it’s currently the tallest free standing structure in Scotland and made up of 1.4 million bricks and 20,000 tons of concrete. Most of the power station has already been torn down and cleared and the site will be used to build hundreds of houses, although no work is being done to upgrade the surrounding roads or infrastructure.
I still remember going to an open day at the plant with my dad and grandad when I was maybe 4 or 5 and having a tour of the whole place. I thought it was amazing and it’s one of the few proper memories I have of my grandad before he succumbed to that scourge of the Clyde, mesothelioma, caused by working with asbestos in the shipyards.
I for one will miss the chimney, along with many who sail the River Clyde who see it as a reassuring landmark.
Inverkip, Scotland.

Looking down the Firth of Clyde.

The chimney of Inverkip Power Station has dominated this view since the 1970s but on 28th July it’s being demolished by explosives. At 236m (778ft) it’s currently the tallest free standing structure in Scotland and made up of 1.4 million bricks and 20,000 tons of concrete. Most of the power station has already been torn down and cleared and the site will be used to build hundreds of houses, although no work is being done to upgrade the surrounding roads or infrastructure.

I still remember going to an open day at the plant with my dad and grandad when I was maybe 4 or 5 and having a tour of the whole place. I thought it was amazing and it’s one of the few proper memories I have of my grandad before he succumbed to that scourge of the Clyde, mesothelioma, caused by working with asbestos in the shipyards.

I for one will miss the chimney, along with many who sail the River Clyde who see it as a reassuring landmark.

Inverkip, Scotland.

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Longtail boats moored on the Chao Phraya River.
Bangkok, Thailand.

Longtail boats moored on the Chao Phraya River.

Bangkok, Thailand.

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Sunset down by the marina.
When I used to see planes going across the sky like the one in this photo I’d always wonder where all the passengers were going and what they would do there, were they going on holiday or heading home, or going away on business. Now I have an app on my phone that tells me exactly where it’s going when I point the camera at it, and I find out it’s actually a UPS cargo plane headed to the Worldhub in Louisville, Kentucky. Not quite as romantic I guess but cool all the same!
Inverkip, Scotland.

Sunset down by the marina.

When I used to see planes going across the sky like the one in this photo I’d always wonder where all the passengers were going and what they would do there, were they going on holiday or heading home, or going away on business. Now I have an app on my phone that tells me exactly where it’s going when I point the camera at it, and I find out it’s actually a UPS cargo plane headed to the Worldhub in Louisville, Kentucky. Not quite as romantic I guess but cool all the same!

Inverkip, Scotland.

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The ferry heading across the Firth of Clyde to Rothesay on the Isle of Bute. The Sleeping Warrior profile of the Arran hills can be seen through the haze left of centre.
Wemyss Bay, Scotland.

The ferry heading across the Firth of Clyde to Rothesay on the Isle of Bute. The Sleeping Warrior profile of the Arran hills can be seen through the haze left of centre.

Wemyss Bay, Scotland.

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Kip Water running into Kip Marina and on into the River Clyde.
In Anglicised Gaelic the word inbhir became inver (meaning “mouth of the river”) hence the name of the village I live in, Inverkip.
Inverkip, Scotland.

Kip Water running into Kip Marina and on into the River Clyde.

In Anglicised Gaelic the word inbhir became inver (meaning “mouth of the river”) hence the name of the village I live in, Inverkip.

Inverkip, Scotland.

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As I was driving home from work tonight a plane went over and left this huge contrail! By the time I was able to get off the motorway and take this photo it was long gone. No idea why all the other planes in the sky were leaving normal sized trails, must have been really cold at the altitude this plane was at I guess. Maybe it was fighting a headwind and was using more power? Anyone know why this would be so pronounced and hang around so long?
West Ferry, Scotland.

As I was driving home from work tonight a plane went over and left this huge contrail! By the time I was able to get off the motorway and take this photo it was long gone. No idea why all the other planes in the sky were leaving normal sized trails, must have been really cold at the altitude this plane was at I guess. Maybe it was fighting a headwind and was using more power? Anyone know why this would be so pronounced and hang around so long?

West Ferry, Scotland.

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The benefit of summer in Scotland is you can still enjoy a can of Bru in the sunshine at half 9 in the evening. Well, on the odd occasion when the sun is actually shining!

The benefit of summer in Scotland is you can still enjoy a can of Bru in the sunshine at half 9 in the evening. Well, on the odd occasion when the sun is actually shining!

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A video I shot on the way home from work on Sunday morning. Watching the sun come up is one of my favourite things.

Make sure to click through to the Vimeo site so you can watch it fullscreen in HD as the quality is pretty dire otherwise!

Cloch Point, Scotland.

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Inverkip Power Station.
This station sits just along the road from the village I live in on the River Clyde. The Clyde allowed ships to deliver oil and also provided cooling water to avoid the use of cooling towers. This was taken in May as they started demolition work and from what I’ve seen in passing most of the buildings have been cleared. The framework of the larger cube like structure and the chimney are the only substantial parts still standing. There has been talk of how the chimney will come down but I haven’t heard any firm timescale.
Construction of Inverkip started in 1970 and was Scotland’s first oil fired power station but as the plant was completed the world found itself in the midst of the 1973 oil crisis. Oil prices soared to the extent it was no longer viable to use Inverkip as a base load generating station and it’s role changed to that of a standby to support peak demands. Capacity was 1,900MW but only 800MW was made available with the rest being mothballed. Full capacity was only used in 1984/85 during the miner’s strike as coal became scarce.
The chimney is 778 feet tall and is the tallest free standing structure in Scotland and third tallest chimney in the UK. It has 4 main flues and a fifth smaller one, although the planned fourth generating unit was never constructed so the fourth flue is capped. It is made up of 1.4 million bricks and 20,000 tonnes of concrete.
The council’s plan is to build 780 or so houses on the site but with no real talk of new schools or infrastructure to support them, not to mention the already heavy rush hour traffic on the A78 which links the site with Greenock and Glasgow beyond.
Inverkip, Scotland.

Inverkip Power Station.

This station sits just along the road from the village I live in on the River Clyde. The Clyde allowed ships to deliver oil and also provided cooling water to avoid the use of cooling towers. This was taken in May as they started demolition work and from what I’ve seen in passing most of the buildings have been cleared. The framework of the larger cube like structure and the chimney are the only substantial parts still standing. There has been talk of how the chimney will come down but I haven’t heard any firm timescale.

Construction of Inverkip started in 1970 and was Scotland’s first oil fired power station but as the plant was completed the world found itself in the midst of the 1973 oil crisis. Oil prices soared to the extent it was no longer viable to use Inverkip as a base load generating station and it’s role changed to that of a standby to support peak demands. Capacity was 1,900MW but only 800MW was made available with the rest being mothballed. Full capacity was only used in 1984/85 during the miner’s strike as coal became scarce.

The chimney is 778 feet tall and is the tallest free standing structure in Scotland and third tallest chimney in the UK. It has 4 main flues and a fifth smaller one, although the planned fourth generating unit was never constructed so the fourth flue is capped. It is made up of 1.4 million bricks and 20,000 tonnes of concrete.

The council’s plan is to build 780 or so houses on the site but with no real talk of new schools or infrastructure to support them, not to mention the already heavy rush hour traffic on the A78 which links the site with Greenock and Glasgow beyond.

Inverkip, Scotland.