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Pagani Zonda Tricolore.
Even the chassis plate looks beautiful. The way the carbon weave runs the same direction across every surface still amazes me.
San Cesario sul Panaro, Italy.

Pagani Zonda Tricolore.

Even the chassis plate looks beautiful. The way the carbon weave runs the same direction across every surface still amazes me.

San Cesario sul Panaro, Italy.

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Looking down a side street.

Modena, Italy.

Looking down a side street.

Modena, Italy.

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In 1962 Giotto Bizzarrini was commissioned by Ferruccio Lamborghini to design and build a 3.5 litre V12 for his 350GT sports car. The specification called for a road car engine, but what Bizzarrini produced was a pure bred, dry sumped race engine producing 359bhp at 9800rpm.
Lamborghini was furious and demanded the engine be redesigned, detuned and wet sumped. He withheld payment and the 350GTV prototype was shown at the 1963 Turin show without an engine, the press being denied a view of the engine bay. Legend has it the car was loaded with 500lbs of bricks in place of the missing power plant!
In the end, the engine would evolve from the 3.5L 280hp of the 350GT, through the Muira, Espada, Countach and Diablo, to the 6.5L 670hp Murcielago LP-670-SV 48 years later.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

In 1962 Giotto Bizzarrini was commissioned by Ferruccio Lamborghini to design and build a 3.5 litre V12 for his 350GT sports car. The specification called for a road car engine, but what Bizzarrini produced was a pure bred, dry sumped race engine producing 359bhp at 9800rpm.

Lamborghini was furious and demanded the engine be redesigned, detuned and wet sumped. He withheld payment and the 350GTV prototype was shown at the 1963 Turin show without an engine, the press being denied a view of the engine bay. Legend has it the car was loaded with 500lbs of bricks in place of the missing power plant!

In the end, the engine would evolve from the 3.5L 280hp of the 350GT, through the Muira, Espada, Countach and Diablo, to the 6.5L 670hp Murcielago LP-670-SV 48 years later.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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The intake manifold and intercoolers dominate the engine bay of a Ferrari F40, as seen through the Perspex engine cover.
The Tipo F120A engine of the F40 was an evolution of the 400hp twin-turbo 2855cc V8 in the 288GTO, but a larger bore, shorter stroke and more boost gave the unit a capacity of 2936cc and an output of 478hp. Combined with a weight of just 1,100kg and the definitive supercar shape, Ferrari had created what many still regard as the greatest sports car of them all.
Maranello, Italy.

The intake manifold and intercoolers dominate the engine bay of a Ferrari F40, as seen through the Perspex engine cover.

The Tipo F120A engine of the F40 was an evolution of the 400hp twin-turbo 2855cc V8 in the 288GTO, but a larger bore, shorter stroke and more boost gave the unit a capacity of 2936cc and an output of 478hp. Combined with a weight of just 1,100kg and the definitive supercar shape, Ferrari had created what many still regard as the greatest sports car of them all.

Maranello, Italy.

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Pagani Zonda R.
San Cesario sul Panaro, Italy.

Pagani Zonda R.

San Cesario sul Panaro, Italy.

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Lamborghini Miura S, one of 140 built between 1968 and 1971.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Miura S, one of 140 built between 1968 and 1971.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Aventador sitting outside the Lamborghini factory.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Aventador sitting outside the Lamborghini factory.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Me enjoying a nice can of Irn Bru (that we’d driven all the way from Glasgow) at 9,000ft, the top of the Stelvio Pass.
Passo dello Stelvio, Italy.

Me enjoying a nice can of Irn Bru (that we’d driven all the way from Glasgow) at 9,000ft, the top of the Stelvio Pass.

Passo dello Stelvio, Italy.

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Badge on the back of a Ferrari F40.
Maranello, Italy.

Badge on the back of a Ferrari F40.

Maranello, Italy.

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Stelvio Pass.
Italy.

Stelvio Pass.

Italy.