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In 1962 Giotto Bizzarrini was commissioned by Ferruccio Lamborghini to design and build a 3.5 litre V12 for his 350GT sports car. The specification called for a road car engine, but what Bizzarrini produced was a pure bred, dry sumped race engine producing 359bhp at 9800rpm.
Lamborghini was furious and demanded the engine be redesigned, detuned and wet sumped. He withheld payment and the 350GTV prototype was shown at the 1963 Turin show without an engine, the press being denied a view of the engine bay. Legend has it the car was loaded with 500lbs of bricks in place of the missing power plant!
In the end, the engine would evolve from the 3.5L 280hp of the 350GT, through the Muira, Espada, Countach and Diablo, to the 6.5L 670hp Murcielago LP-670-SV 48 years later.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

In 1962 Giotto Bizzarrini was commissioned by Ferruccio Lamborghini to design and build a 3.5 litre V12 for his 350GT sports car. The specification called for a road car engine, but what Bizzarrini produced was a pure bred, dry sumped race engine producing 359bhp at 9800rpm.

Lamborghini was furious and demanded the engine be redesigned, detuned and wet sumped. He withheld payment and the 350GTV prototype was shown at the 1963 Turin show without an engine, the press being denied a view of the engine bay. Legend has it the car was loaded with 500lbs of bricks in place of the missing power plant!

In the end, the engine would evolve from the 3.5L 280hp of the 350GT, through the Muira, Espada, Countach and Diablo, to the 6.5L 670hp Murcielago LP-670-SV 48 years later.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Miura S, one of 140 built between 1968 and 1971.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Miura S, one of 140 built between 1968 and 1971.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Aventador sitting outside the Lamborghini factory.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Aventador sitting outside the Lamborghini factory.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Countach Anniversary.
Like every boy in the 80s I had a poster of a Countach on my wall. In fact I had two, one was a big long one somebody got me for Christmas. To my eye the Anniversary of 1988 was a step to far in terms of styling, looking clunky and busy after the purity of the LP500 and 5000QV that went before. The amazing rear end of those earlier models was replaced by a horrible tacked on bumper and square lights.
I still have an issue of Fast Lane magazine from the mid-80s when they clocked a Countach QV at a two-way average of 195mph on a public autostrada! Brave men!
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Countach Anniversary.

Like every boy in the 80s I had a poster of a Countach on my wall. In fact I had two, one was a big long one somebody got me for Christmas. To my eye the Anniversary of 1988 was a step to far in terms of styling, looking clunky and busy after the purity of the LP500 and 5000QV that went before. The amazing rear end of those earlier models was replaced by a horrible tacked on bumper and square lights.

I still have an issue of Fast Lane magazine from the mid-80s when they clocked a Countach QV at a two-way average of 195mph on a public autostrada! Brave men!

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Reventón.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Reventón.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Murcielago on a wall.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Murcielago on a wall.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Muira Concept from 2006. This was a design exercise to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the introduction of the original Muira.
Lamborghini Museum, Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Muira Concept from 2006. This was a design exercise to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the introduction of the original Muira.

Lamborghini Museum, Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Aventador at the entrance to the Lamborghini factory.
Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Aventador at the entrance to the Lamborghini factory.

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini LM002.
With all the popularity of Range Rovers and G-Wagons and the like it’s easy to forget where the pumped up SUV look began. Back in 1986, when bare G-Wagons were still primarily used for hit and run espionage missions into East Germany, Lamborghini took the off-roader and turned it into a monster by evolving the mid-engined Cheetah into the front-engined LM002.
Powered by a detuned 444bhp version of the 5.2 litre V12 from the Countach and weighing well over 2 and a half tons the LM002 was faster than a Golf GTI of the day, yet could climb a 120% gradient unassisted. The enormous Scorpion tyres were specially developed by Pirelli. 301 were built with most going to the deserts of the middle east.
Lamborghini Museum, Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini LM002.

With all the popularity of Range Rovers and G-Wagons and the like it’s easy to forget where the pumped up SUV look began. Back in 1986, when bare G-Wagons were still primarily used for hit and run espionage missions into East Germany, Lamborghini took the off-roader and turned it into a monster by evolving the mid-engined Cheetah into the front-engined LM002.

Powered by a detuned 444bhp version of the 5.2 litre V12 from the Countach and weighing well over 2 and a half tons the LM002 was faster than a Golf GTI of the day, yet could climb a 120% gradient unassisted. The enormous Scorpion tyres were specially developed by Pirelli. 301 were built with most going to the deserts of the middle east.

Lamborghini Museum, Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

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Lamborghini Reventón.
Lamborghini Museum, Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.

Lamborghini Reventón.

Lamborghini Museum, Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy.